TU BRAUNSCHWEIG

Current Projects

CAOS - Catchments as Organised Systems

The overall objective of the research unit is to provide a new framework for building hydrological models that allow a much more realistic representation of the surface and especially subsurface architecture of catchments at the lower mesoscale (10–200 km2). Key methodological objective is to unite a) the recent observation and exploration technology from soil physics, geophysics, remote sensing and hydrology with b) our understanding of landscape formation and soil structure development and c) reductionist process models as learning tools to assess novel information on surface and subsurface structures as well as on distributed process dynamics. Key theoretical objective is to develop a model and mathematical framework that allows better integration of this information into the model identification process and thus facilitates communication between experimentalists and modellers. Research will be conducted in the hydrological observatory “Attert basin” that has been operated by the Gabriel Lippmann Research Institute in Luxemburg since 2003 and is among the best investigated basins in the World.

Subproject J:Feedbacks between bioactivity and soil hydrology

CAOS

Soil structure determines a large part of the spatial heterogeneity in water storage and fluxes from the plot to the hillslope scale. In recent decades important progress in hydrological research has been achieved by including soil structure in hydrological models. One of the main problems herein remains the difficulty of measuring soil structure and quantifying its influence on hydrological processes. As soil structure is very often of biogenic origin (macropores), the main objective of this project is to use the influence of bioactivity and resulting soil structures to describe and support modeling of hydrological processes at different scales. Therefore, local scale bioactivity will be linked to local infiltration patterns under varying catchment conditions. At hillslope scale, the spatial distribution of bioactivity patterns will be linked to connectivity of subsurface structures to explain subsurface stormflow generation. Then we will apply species distribution modeling of key organisms in order to extrapolate the gained knowledge to the catchment scale.

As on one hand, bioactivity influences the hydrological processes, but on the other hand the species distribution also depends on soil moisture contents, including the feedbacks between bioactivity and soil hydrology is pivotal for getting reliable predictions of catchment scale hydrological behavior under land use change and climate change.

Project Lead

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Erwin Zehe (KIT)

Dr. Laurent Pfister (LIST)

Theresa Blume (GFZ Potsdam)

Subproject:

Prof. Dr. Boris Schröder-Esselbach

Team

Anne-Kathrin Schneider

Dr. Tobias Hohenbrink

External Cooperation Partners

GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences

Universität Potsdam

TU Berlin

University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna

LMU

KIT

MPI Jena

Universität Freiburg

Universität Hohenheim

UFZ Helmholtz Zentrum für Umweltforschung

LIST

ETH Zürich

Funding Body

DFG

Duration

2015-2018

Metapolis - An inter- and transdisciplinary platform for sustainable development of urban-rural relations in Lower Saxony, Germany

Over the next four years, scientists from TU Braunschweig and Leibniz Universität Hannover will investigate existing and future strategies for sustainable relations between urban and rural areas in Lower Saxony. They will also develop an interactive platform from which interested citizens can call up the findings obtained.

Positionspapier

Project Lead

Prof. Dr. Vanessa Carlow (TUBS ISU)

Prof. Dr. Boris Schröder-Esselbach

Team

Dr. Michael Strohbach

Andreas Dahlkamp

Anne-Kathrin Schneider

External Cooperation Partners

TUBS ISU

TUBS Institut für Wirtschaftsinformatik

TUBS IVE

TUBS ISW

TUBS IGS

LUH Institut für Strömungsmechanik und Umweltphysik im Bauwesen

Funding Body

MWK

Volkswagenstiftung

Duration

2016-2020

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SeaArt - Long term establishment of SEAgrass ecosystems through biodegradable ARTificial meadows

Seagrass meadows are important ecosystems which provide a wide variety of ecosystem services but are under threat from anthropogenic pressures. Seagrass growth occurs in a feedback process in which existing seagrass dampens waves and currents and reduces water turbidity. This improves the growing conditions for further seagrass. However, without existing seagrass a restoration is almost impossible.

Over the next four years, scientists of the TU Braunschweig, the Hochschule Hanover, the Leibniz Universität Hannover, the Dutch Institute for Marine Research and company Soiltec GmbH will therefore develop an artificial seagrass that creates good growing conditions for seagrass, thereby breaking the vicious circle of re-establishment. The artificial seagrass will consist exclusively of biodegradable materials, so that in the long term a purely natural seagrass meadow will be created. In addition, the project team will investigate which areas in the German North Sea are particularly suitable for the restoration of seagrass in order to be able to start a first attempt at re-establishment with the help of biodegradable artificial meadows in a follow-up project.

sea-art.org


Seegras unter Wasser

Project Lead

Maike Paul, PhD

Prof. Dr. Boris Schröder-Esselbach

Team

Jana Carus

External Cooperation Partners

Moritz Thom (FZK)

Prof. Dr. Hans-Josef Endres, Dr. Carmen Arndt, Hannah Behnsen (Hochschule Hannover Institut für Biokunststoffe und Bioverbundwerkstoffe)

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Torsten Schlurmann, Dr.-Ing. Jan Visscher, Raúl Villanueva (LUH Ludwig-Franzius-Institut für Wasserbau, Ästuar- und Küsteningenieurwesen)

Sven Adamietz (Soiltec GmbH)

Funding Body

MWK

Volkswagenstiftung

Duration

2016-2020

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GreenFutureForest - Scenarios for sustainable forest management strengthening the Green Infrastructure

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Subproject: Population dynamics of bird species

Project aim: The aim of this project is to analyze the effects of green infrastructure (GI) properties (e.g. forest status and connectivity) as well as climate variables on (meta-)population dynamics and the occurence of forest-dwelling bird species occupying different ecological niches. The statistical modeling applied to analyze these effects is also the basis for a (semi-)mechanistic hybrid model approach to model the (meta-)population dynamic of key species spatially explicitly on landscape level. These (meta-)population models are then used to test how the (meta-)population sizes of the key species predicted over the next 100 years differs between forestry scenarios developed within other subprojects for Central European mixed forests.

Project structure: The work plan contains 5 definable tasks which are part of work packages 4 (Models for landscape-scale spatial (meta-)population dynamics of focal species) and 6 ((Meta-)population projection assuming global and regional scenarios) of the main project:

1) Estimation of statistical models based on bird census data for species occupying different ecological niches and thus affected differently by habitat changes. Predictors are climate variables and forest stand properties.

2) Validation of these models using extisting GIS and lidar data as well as aerial photos of selected plots of woodpecker and warbler projects in Switzerland.

3) Based on the statistical models, parameterization of a (semi-)mechanistic hybrid model approach to spatially model (meta-)population dynamic of key bird species on landscape level.

4) Prediction of species distributions over the next 100 years utilizing climate projections and predicted forest properties (output of other subprojects).

5) Comparison of species distributions between forestry scenarios developed within the project.

Results to be delivered:

1) Validated statistical models for bird species that occupy different ecological niches and are therefore differently influenced by habitat changes. Predictors are climate variables and forest characteristics.

3) (Semi-)mechanistic hybrid model for spatial modelling of (meta-)population dynamics of priority species at landscape level based on the statistical models.

4) Projections of species distribution over the next 100 years, based on climate projections and predicted forest characteristics from other subprojects.

5) Comparison of forestry scenarios.

Preliminary information and results:

Interim report May 2018

Project Lead

Prof. Tord Snäll (SLU)

Subproject:

Prof. Dr. Boris Schröder-Esselbach

Team

Dr. Pedro J. Leitão

External Cooperation Partners

Prof. Dr. Tord Snäll, ArtDatabanken Swedish Species Information Centre, Box 7007, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden

Prof. Dr. Thomas Hahn, Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. Eva-Maria Nordström, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Forest Resource Management, Division of Forest Planning, SE-901 83 Umeå, Sweden

Dr. Jenni Nordén, Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), Postboks 1066, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo, Norway

Prof. Dr. Arpat Ozgul, Dr. Michael Griesser, Dr. Paul Haverkamp, University of Zurich, Dept. of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, Winterthurstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich, Switzerland

Prof. Dr. Hans Pretzsch, Dr. Enno Uhl. Dr. Astor Toraño Caicoya, Laura Zeller, Technische Universität München, Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan, Lehrstuhl für Waldwachstumskunde, Freising, Germany

Funding Body

BMBF, Projketträger DLR

Duration

2016 - 2019

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RUINS - Risks, Uncertainty and Insurance under Climate Change. Coastal Land Management on the German North Sea

The impacts of climate change as well as the consequences of adaptations are uncertain. These uncertainties may be deeper than “risk”, where one knows at least the probabilities of potential future outcomes. In particular, there may be “Knightian uncertainty”, where one knows the potential outcomes but not their probabilities. In this inter- and transdisciplinary project, we study both risk and Knightian uncertainty of climate change impacts and adaptation options for the case of coastal land management on the German North Sea, where people benefit from a suite of ecosystem services which are subject to climate change and to alternative land management options. In this case, both risk and uncertainty are relevant for decision-making about local adaptations to climate change. We combine economics with landscape ecology through modelling, and we include local stakeholders in the process of analysis and conclusion.

Project Lead

Prof. Dr. Stefan Baumgärtner (Universität Freiburg)

Subprojects 2 and 4

Prof. Dr. Boris Schröder-Esselbach

Team

Dr. Anett Schibalski

N.N. - Vacant Postdoc position Link to the job offer

External Cooperation Partners

Universität Freiburg

Funding Body

BMBF, DLR

Duration

2018-2021

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HaMac - Interactions between habitats and macrophytes (phragmites and phalaris) on federal waterways

Phragmites australis and Phalaris arundinacea are among the naturally occurring species that are common along the Elbe as a federal waterway. Regardless of location, the occurrence of both species offers diverse ecosystem services. This includes natural bank protection, but also the provision of habitat for fauna.
Although both species occur along the Elbe, there are strong differences in their zoning and distribution. The causes of regional and local patterns are to be clarified in this project. The analysis of site conditions will provide information on species distribution. In addition, the study of interactions at the interfaces between plant physiology, morphology and hydrodynamics will provide insights into the resilience of species to changing environmental conditions - such as level changes, accumulation of extreme weather events and varying sediment concentrations. For this purpose, methods of statistical and process-oriented modelling are coupled with measurements in field and laboratory investigations.
The focus of the research is on the analysis and modelling of
1) vegetation-influenced sedimentation processes and
2) the reaction of the biomass of Phragmites australis and Phalaris arundinacea to varying hydrological and site-dependent conditions
and
3) Trials for the recolonisation of erosion-damaged sites.


Project Lead

Prof. Dr. Boris Schröder-Esselbach

Team

Andreas Dahlkamp

Funding Body

Bundesanstalt für Gewässerkunde

Duration

2018-2021

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Open City – Theories, perspectives, instruments

Openness is a central theme of current social debates when questions of belonging, security or resource allocation are being negotiated. These debates are particularly tangible in urban areas. The discourse of urban research, fed by findings from various disciplines, is aware of the importance of openness for the emergence, development and future viability of cities. Openness, unlike its antagonism closeness, is expressed in three interrelated dimensions: the openness of physical spaces, the openness of social, economic and ecological systems and the openness of the future in the sense of a temporal dimension. The project OPEN CITY addresses these three facets and uses Berlin as an example to examine which new approaches, strategies and tools of urban development result from bringing together concepts and approaches of openness between city and society. The fundamental question is how openness in its dimensions can offer new approaches to the questions of urban transformation by systematically integrating it into urban development processes. It is about sounding out concepts and approaches to be able to counter the multiple uncertainties in processes of urban development against the background of current challenges without irrevocably obstructing the future opportunities of tomorrow today.

Project Lead

Prof. Dr. Vanessa Carlow (TUBS ISU)

Team

Dr. Michael Strohbach

External Cooperation Partners

TUBS ISU

Deutsches Institut für Urbanistik

TU Dortmund: Stadt und Regionalsoziologie

Funding Body

Robert Bosch Stiftung

Duration

2017-2020

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Management of water bodies to promote biodersity - a contribution to the implementation of the biodiversity strategy in cities

DBU Project 33654/01

Biological diversity in the city is one of the priority fields of action of the nature conservation offensive 2020 of German Ministry of Environment as part of the national biodiversity strategy. Urban waters have great potential to promote the particularly endangered aquatic biodiversity (Goertzen & Suhling 2015: Ins. Cons. Diver. 8). Since these waters are subject to a variety of influences and often intensive uses that affect their ecological conditions, efforts are being made to improve the conditions through adapted water engineering measures and revitalisation. However, little is known about the effects of different sustentation measures on aquatic biocenosis. Therefore, the interrelationships between other urban influencing factors and biodiversity have also insufficiently researched and understood.
In Braunschweig, we regularly discuss how the aims of maintaining required services of surface waters, such as flood control, and support of biodiversity can be combined with partners from urban administration, conservation, and companies. It became evident that there is a need for an ecologically effective management concept for urban waters. Our aim is to develop such a management concept that promotes sustainable conservation of local biodiversity and the ecosystem services of urban waters. We will evaluate the current repertoire of measures with regard to their impact on biodiversity and deepen our understanding of the interrelationships between urban influences and aquatic biodiversity as well as the occurrence of protected species. In particular, we will link scientific research with practical requirements in order to derive recommendations for action for sustentation measures.
We presume that the biodiversity of macrozoobenthos can be specifically promoted by adapting methods and intensity of water care. We record the biodiversity of the macrozoobenthos at 70 sample sites in flowing water bodies and of the dragonflies and gastropods as well as aquatic plants in 30 standing water bodies. Eight years of preparatory work have provided us with a data basis for flowing waters. In order to analyse the effects of sustentation measures, we will cut off the type of sustentation (e. g. mowing, clearing, grazing) and its intensity (frequency, flatness) with data. In addition, we will carry out further detailed studies on urban factors influencing water bodies and pilot studies for the evaluation of sustentation measures. Based on these results, a concept of measures is developed and made available to potential users such as sustentation associations and city administrations in the form of a guideline.

Project Lead

Prof. (apl.) Dr. Frank Suhling

Team

Diana Goertzen

External Cooperation Partners

Stadtentwässerung Braunschweig GmbH

Untere Naturschutzbehörde der Stadt Braunschweig

Förderkreis Umwelt- und Naturschutz Hondelage (fun) e.V.

Funding Body

DBU

Duration

2017-2020

GRADVEG - Quantifying and modelling interactive GRADients in VEGetation-hydrodynamic systems: the key to an improved prediction of aquatic system resilience to environmental change

The interaction of vegetation with waves and currents is of growing interest, especially with regard to the potential benefits of vegetation for coastal and river bank protection measures. However, the influence of individual plant parameters on wave and flow damping is not yet fully understood. The project GRADVEG (Quantification and modelling of interactive GRADients in VEGetation hydrodynamics systems) investigates how an uneven vertical distribution of the key parameters biomass, stiffness and buoyancy affects the hydraulic plant resistance. In addition, the influence of varying physical parameters (e.g. salinity of water) on the mechanical properties of plants is evaluated. The natural range of these plant parameters is recorded in the field and related to the hydrodynamic conditions in which the respective population grows. Based on the recorded values and their natural variability, artificial plants with different gradients of the three key parameters are developed and used for a detailed laboratory study. The physical experiments are supported by a numerical study to identify the relevant parameter ranges.

Project Lead

Maike Paul. PhD

Team

Wolfgang Max

Elina Ott

External Cooperation Partners

Dr. Eduardo Infantes, Institutionen för marina vetenskaper, Göteborgs Universität, Schweden

Dr. Tim Marjoribanks, School of Civil and Building Engineering, Loughborough University, UK

Funding Body

DFG

Duration

2015-2018

Completed Projects

Investigation of the rules and regulations for railway operation as to weak points with regard to the expected climate change

Climate change is regarded as one of the greatest social challenges of our time and major efforts must be made not only to protect climate but also to adapt to its changes. Germany is expected to see an increase in extreme weather events and an rise in their intensity. These include heat waves, storms, heavy rain or long periods of drought.

In the railway sector, there are a large number of regulations and sets of rules which regulate the technical and operational sequence of the individual subsystems and their interaction. Considering the possible effects of climate change, an adaptation of the existing regulations and rules is necessary. In a first step, appropriate contents and passages for which climate change is relevant must be identified. The Department of Landscape Ecology & Environmental Systems Analysis is analyzing climate change scenarios for this project.

Project Lead

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Thomas Siefer (TUBS IVE)

Team

Dr. Michael Strohbach

External Cooperation Partners

TUBS IVE Institut für Verkehrswesen, Eisenbahnbau und -betrieb

Funding Body

Eisenbahn-Bundesamt

Duration

2017 - 2018

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Designing with nature - Tools for interdisciplinary work with permaculture

With "Permaculture - Systemic Thinking and Complex Planning", the Institute for Geoecology (IGÖ), supported by teach4TU, has created a teaching format in the summer semester of 2017, which provides students of environmental sciences with an ecologically, socially and economically sound planning strategy. In cooperation with the Institute for Sustainable Urbanism (ISU), this planning method will be further developed in a subsequent innovation project starting in the winter semester of 2017/2018. The idea of the planned teaching project is to develop the joint interdisciplinary teaching and learning concept "Designing with nature - Tools for interdisciplinary work with permaculture". The holistic planning approach of permaculture adopted by the IGÖ is supplemented with tried and tested design methods of the ISU (e. g. Urban Toolbox) and a common methodical toolbox for interdisciplinary design mediation will be developed. The teaching and learning concept corresponds to the goal of both institutes to impart methods of interdisciplinary and extended conceptual understanding to the students and to exchange and learn foreign content and competences in group work. Project-oriented learning is the predominant didactic method. In addition, the latest findings from the institutes' joint work to date, such as the METAPOLIS research project, will be incorporated into teaching. In this way, students can participate in the current and highly relevant methods of research.

Project Lead

Prof. Dr. Boris Schröder-Esselbach

Team

Sonja Lepper

External Cooperation Partners

Prof. Dr. Vanessa Carlow (TUBS ISU)

Funding Body

BMBF, über teach4TU

Duration

2017-2018

This teaching project is funded by the BMBF project teach4TU within the framework of the innovation programme Good Teaching at the TU Braunschweig under the funding code 01PL17043.

RELease from coastal squEEZE (RELEEZE) - Understanding and preventing critical tipping points under future sea level rise

RELease from coastal squEEZE (RELEEZE) aims to identify management options for the barrier islands and the neighbouring mainland coast that allow a shift from a 'hold the line' strategy to a nature-based strategy with increased flexibility and improved adaptability. Without this change in strategy, the predicted faster rise in sea levels could have profound negative consequences for flora and fauna (biodiversity), human settlement and economic use. This, in turn, could result in large economic losses and high costs for securing future coastal protection.

First results

In the Wadden Sea of Lower Saxony, a man-made, fixed dyke line nowadays prevents natural spatial shifts in ecosystems of coastal areas, including the mainland shoreline. An expected future sea-level rise can lead to a loss of mudflats and salt marshes in the dyke foreland. This process, known as coastal squeeze, can lead to a critical tipping point of the natural coastal system, especially the Wadden Sea. In addition to the loss of the unique flora and fauna of the Wadden Sea, the disapperance of coastal ecosystem services, including coastal protection, will have a strong impact on society. This abolition would lead to enormous economic damages and costs for securing future coastal protection.

In order to avoid the loss of coastal ecosystems, preserve their coastal protection functions and their UNESCO World Heritage value, RELEEZE is investigating potential management options that will provide new space for sediment accumulation, salt marshes and dune ecosystems and preserve their ecosystem services as part of natural coastal protection solutions. The aim is to increase the resilience of the coastal systems and to protect them from exceeding the critical tipping point.

In order to understand the effects and interactions of the tipping point on the human use of the Wadden Sea and the adjacent areas, interviews and workshops were organised with different user groups. The interviews and workshops were helpful in gathering and describing the knowledge and perspectives of the individual users with regard to the parts of the overall system that were visible to them. The knowledge of all user groups was thus integrated into the scientific literature on the ecological Wadden Sea system and gaps in knowledge were uncovered. By integrating the scientific state of the art and practical knowledge, a comprehensive system map could be created. This system map can in turn be divided into three different geographical areas, which bundle different user groups. These are the land behind the first dyke line, the Wadden Sea and the islands.


Along the mainland coast of Lower Saxony there is partly a double dyke line. For the area between the first and second dyke line, topics such as settlement, agricultural land use, coastal and nature conservation as well as drainage and tourism were discussed. One focus was to think about whether and for how long the current use of this area can remain unchanged and from which thresholds new, adaptive use concepts must be introduced.

The East Frisian Wadden Sea stretches from the barrier islands to the tidal flats and salt marshes as a transition from the marine to the terrestrial environment. Massive land reclamation and embankments over the last thousand years cut off the gently rising transitions between land and sea, in which the fine sediment would otherwise deposit. Without these deposits, the predicted faster rise in sea level can lead to salt marshes turning into tidal flats and permanently flooded areas over the next several hundred years.

In the Wadden Sea, discussed priorities related to the development of sediment management, nature and coastal protection, shipping, fisheries and tourism. Since the Wadden Sea is an important part of the East Atlantic Flyway, bird conservation was also an issue.

The East Frisian barrier islands form the border between the Wadden Sea and the open North Sea. Population, tourism, nature and coastal protection and the supply of drinking water were important points of discussion here.

On the barrier islands, dune belts provide natural protection against floods and storm surges, which in turn can lead to the removal of parts of the dune's leading edge. The dune vegetation catches sand, which is transported by the wind and hold it with the roots, so that the dunes grow again. Under natural conditions, dunes therefore constantly change their shape and position. This can also be an additional source of sediment for the growth of the salt marshes, as dune flooding transports sand into the salt marsh behind it. Sand input into the Wadden Sea during storm surges can also promote the growth of existing and new salt marshes, as salt marsh formation can occur under conditions that are sufficiently energetic to transport sand.

Salt marshes are species-rich plant communities in the tidal area of the coast. They are key habitats and feeding grounds for numerous birds and invertebrates, making a significant contribution to biodiversity. The complex structure of the plant population dampens wave energy and tidal currents, which can deposit sediment with every flooding and cause it to grow slowly upwards. As sea levels rise, salt marshes are flooded more frequently, which means more sediment is deposited and they can grow up more quickly. This effect could lead to salt marshes growing along with rising sea levels. Salt marshes, however, have only limited flood tolerance, so that they literally drown when the sedimentation rate is insufficient to allow them to grow up with the more rapidly rising sea level. Another mechanism for adapting to rising sea levels is migration to higher elevations, but this is limited along the Wadden Sea coast by the dyke line.

Project Lead

Prof. Dr. Boris Schröder-Esselbach

Prof. Dr. Bernd Siebenhüner (Universität Oldenburg)

Team

Maike Paul, PhD

Jana Carus

External Cooperation Partners

Prof. Dr. Michael Kleyer (Universität Oldenburg)

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Jürgen Jensen (Universität Siegen)

Pof. Dr. Britta Tietjen (FU Berlin)

Prof. Dr. Vanessa Carlow (TUBS ISU)

Dr. Achim Wehrmann (Senckenberg am Meer)

Dr. Alexander Bartholomä (Senckenberg am Meer)

Diana Giebels

Thorsten Grothmann

Funding Body

BMBF, Projketträger DLR

Duration

2017-2018

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AgroEcoSOS - AGROECOlogical solutions for Safe and fair Operating Spaces of agricultural systems in the urban-rural transition zone

Today, intensive agriculture makes a substantial contribution to exceeding the limits of our planet's ecological sustainability. At local and regional level, too, agriculture is often anything but sustainable. AGROECOSOS will define so-called Safe and fair Operating Spaces (SOS), a scope for action for agriculture within which the limits of sustainability are not exceeded.
In recent years, agro-ecological research has proposed a variety of solutions to improve both yields and the resilience and sustainability of agriculture. A promising concept is permaculture, which reproduces the properties of natural systems in a design process and incorporates socio-ecological approaches. Permaculture is based on design principles that include multifunctionality, biodiversity, yield reliability with low use of agrochemicals, but also social-philosophical dimensions.

Project Lead

Prof. Dr. Boris Schröder-Esselbach

Team

Sonja Lepper

Dr. Colette Vogeler

External Cooperation Partners

Prof. Dr. Nils Bandelow (TUBS ISW)

Prof. Dr. Stefan Schrader, Dr. Anett Steinführer, Dr. Jens Dauber (Thünen Institut)

Prof. Dr. Jörg Michael Greef (Julius-Kühn-Institut)

Prof. Dr. Vanessa Carlow (TUBS ISU)

Prof. Dr. Almut Grüntuch-Ernst (TUBS IDAS)

Prof. Dr. Lars Wolf (TUBS IBR)

Prof. Dr. Frank Wätzold (btu)

Prof. Dr. Ralf Seppelt (UFZ)

Funding Body

BMBF, Projektträger ptj

Duration

2017-2018

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COMTESS - Sustainable Coastal Land Management: Trade-Offs in Ecosystem Services

Coastal regions will be especially affected by climate change, i.e. rising sea-levels, increase of storms and winter precipitation. Ecosystems might change in ways that affect the stability of ecosystem functions and, thus, the provision of ecosystem services that coastal communities rely on today.

This project will investigate different land use scenarios for sites at the German North and Baltic Sea coast under climate change. The main focus is to evaluate ecosystem functions and services provided by these coastal regions and how they are affected by environmental change and different land management options. Work package 5 (“Modelling of biodiversity and plant-mediated ecosystem services (ESS) in response to land use management and environmental change”) is undertaken by the University of Potsdam. Part 1 of this sub-project lies with the Institute of Earth and Environmental Science, part 2 with the Institute of Biochemistry and Biology.

In detail, WP 5 will yield the ecological evaluation of the COMTESS scenarios by statistically modelling the functional and response diversity (WP 5.1) and developing a process- based model for the spatio- temporal dynamics of key species and plant- mediated ESS (WP 5.2). For this purpose, we will upscale the plot-level one (or two)-year measurements of WP 1 - 4 to the landscape scale and to time scales ranging from 2010 to 2100. The statistical niche modelling of WP 5.1 will be enhanced with the transient plant community dynamics captured by the individual-based model of WP 5.2. Finally, the insurance effect of functionally redundant species on the resilience of ESF and, thus, the provision of ESS will be analysed for variable environmental conditions. The predictions from WP 5 will be summarized in a GIS modelling shell used by later work packages for the ecological-economic analysis. More...

 

Project Lead

Prof. Dr. Michael Kleyer (Universität Oldenburg)

Teilprojekte 5 und 8: Prof. Dr. Boris Schröder-Esselbach

Team

Dr. Anett Schibalski

External Cooperation Partners

Universität Potsdam

Universität Rostock

Universität Oldenburg

Universität Freiburg

Universität Hohenheim

Universität Greifswald

Universität Hildesheim

Universität Koblenz-Landau

Funding Body

BMBF, FONA, DLR

Duration

2011-2016

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BIOPORE - Linking spatial patterns of anecic earthworm populations, preferential flow pathways and agrochemical transport in rural catchments: an ecohydrological model approach

Earthworms play a pivotal role in agro-ecosystem functioning by modulating soil structure that significantly influences soil hydraulic properties, organic matter dynamics, and plant growth. This project focuses on anecic earthworms like Lumbricus terrestris which create vertical semi-permanent burrows that function as preferential flow pathways. Preferential flow in macropores is a key process which strongly affects infiltration and may cause rapid transport of pesticides into depths of 80 to 150 cm where they experience a much slower degradation. Therefore, preferential transport is an environmental problem because the topsoil is bypassed, which has been originally thought to act as a filter to protect the subsoil and shallow groundwater. Assessing the environmental risk of pesticides in earthworm burrows and how human management practise feedbacks on that risk requires the development of an integrated eco-hydrological model. This model allows predictions of i) the spatiotemporal distribution and population dynamics of anecic earthworms, ii) the related pattern of connective preferential flow pathways (i.e., earthworm burrows), and iii) the space-time pattern of infiltration and travel depth distribution of solutes. This enables the understanding of how small-scale patterns regulate large-scale processes in rural landscapes and how feedbacks between earthworm engineering and transport characteristics affect the functioning of (agro-)ecosystems. We expect our final model to be applicable for catchment-scale risk assessment that may assist agrochemical registration. More...

Project Lead

Prof. Dr. Boris Schröder-Esselbach

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Erwin Zehe (KIT)

Team

Dr. Loes von Schaik (TU Berlin)

Juliane Palm (Universität Potsdam)

Dr. Julian Klaus (LIST)

External Cooperation Partners

KIT Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

Funding Body

DFG

Duration

2007-2011

Understanding downstream migration of European eel (Anguilla anguilla) - Analysis and modelling of migration triggers

The European eel stock is in steep decline and consequently the species has been added to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species as critically endangered. In order to reduce the anthropogenic mortality caused by hydroelectric power plants turbines, it is absolutely necessary to identify the environmental triggers for downstream migration towards their maritime spawning grounds. The aim of this project is to identify and quantitatively describe these triggers and develop predictive models. Therefore, environmental data will be combined with catch data and infrared video data from several trapping sites in three “top-11 rivers” in southern Sweden by means of advanced statistical modelling approaches. This will help to identify environmental windows of optimal migration conditions, described by threshold combinations of triggers. The results will enable an enhanced turbine management for hydroelectric power plants which will consequently contribute to achieve the goals of the Swedish Eel Management Plan.

Project Lead

Prof. Dr. Boris Schröder-Esselbach

Team

Florian Stein

External Cooperation Partners

Olle Calles, PhD (Karlstads Universität)

Dr. Uwe Brämick (Institut für Binnenfischerei Potsdam-Sacrow)

Funding Body

Elforsk 'Krafttag ål'

Universität Karlskrona, Schweden

Duration

2012-2014

Biodiversity and Sustainable Management of a Megadiverse Mountain Ecosystem in South Ecuador

DFG-Research Unit/research group FOR 816 (Phase 1) Functionality in Tropical Mountain Rainforest

Subproject A3.3: Spatial-temporal dynamics of landslides and their biotic & abiotic controls

Project Lead

Prof. Dr. Jörg Bendix (Universität Marburg)

Teilprojekt: Prof. Dr. Andreas Huth (UFZ)

Prof. Dr. Boris Schröder-Esselbach

Team

Dr. Peter Vorpahl

External Cooperation Partners

UFZ Leipzig-Halle

Universität Beyreuth

Universität Marburg

Funding Body

DFG

Duration

2007-2010


  last changed 09.10.2018
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